Dry Eye and Meibomian Gland Dysfunction Treatments

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Dry Eye and Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD) Treatment Options

There are many treatments for Dry Eye Symptoms such as non-prescription eye drops and warm compresses.  Most, however, only provide short-term symptom relief. For patients who suffer from inflammation or dry eye symptoms due to a tear deficiency or reduced tear production, there are various types of prescription medication that your doctor may prescribe such as Restasis and Xiidra. Other short-term symptom alleviating treatments range from natural supplements, to implants that control tear output, to a device that offers manual neurostimulation called TrueTear. Most of these treatment remedies and medications focused on tear replacement or reduction of inflammation do not address MGD, known to be a root cause of Dry Eye symptoms and shown to affect 86% of those patients with dry eye1.

Treating The Symptoms

Eye Drops

Administering Eye Drops for Dry Eye TreatmentOver-the-counter and prescription drops can provide temporary relief of dry eye symptoms.

Gland Expression

Gland ExpressionClearing blockages in the Meibomian glands allows proper function to resume.

Punctal Plugs

Punctum Plug Treatment for Dry EyePunctal Plugs are inserted into the tear ducts with a goal of holding the tears on the eye.

Hot Compresses

Compress for Dry Eye TreatmentWarm compresses heat the front surface of the eyelids to provide temporary relief.

Eyelid Maintenance Products

Products to relieve Dry Eye symptomsEyelid scrubs remove debris from the eyelashes and the lid margin.

Omega – 3 Fish Oils

Fish Oil for Dry Eye ReliefOmega-3 oils can suppress inflammation or irritation in some dry eye patients.

Treating the Root Cause of Dry Eye with LipiFlow®

LipiFlow® is a 12-minute treatment performed in your doctor’s office designed to remove blockages from the Meibomian glands, allowing them to properly function and produce the oils that make up the top protective top lipid layer of the tear film.  LipiFlow® activators are single-use sterile devices that safely and comfortably deliver a combination of heat to the inner lids and simultaneous therapeutic motion to the outer lids, removing blockages from the Meibomian glands2. The Activators are contoured to avoid contact with the cornea, protecting the delicate structures of the eye.  Maximum results are usually experienced 6-8 weeks after treatment. 

If you suffer from Dry Eye symptoms, ask your eye care professional to check for MGD and find out more about treatment with LipiFlow®.

LipiFlow® — Proven Effective for Treating Meibomian Gland Dysfunction

LipiFlow® uses vectored thermal pulsating eyepieces known as Activators. LipiFlow Activators are precisely designed to provide necessary inner and outer lid contact, to properly apply heat and massage and clear the Meibomian glands.

The entire treatment takes approximately 12 minutes and on average causes minimal discomfort. The clinical science behindMeibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD) as the primary cause of dry eye and its effective treatment with LipiFlow is supported by scientific research. Removal of the gland blockages is essential to improve gland function and reduce the progression of MGD.

LipiFlow is a 12 minute treatment that is the only FDA cleared treatment using thermal pulsating heat to remove blockages in the Meibomian glands.

On of the most common causes of Dry Eye symptoms is Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD), a condition that results from blocked oil producing glands in the eyelids. When MGD is present, it should be properly treated as a way to maintain a healthy tear film, the protective coating on our eye. If MGD is left untreated and the blocked glands stop functioning, the glands can deteriorate and irrecoverable damage is possible.

1Lemp MA, Crews LA, Bron AJ, Foulks GN, Sullivan BD. Distribution of aqueous deficient and evaporative dry eye in a clinic based patient cohort: a retrospective study. Cornea. 2012; 31(5):472-478.

2Blackie C, Carlson AN, Korb DR. Treatment for meibomian gland dysfunction and dry eye symptoms with a single-dose vectored thermal pulsation: a review. Current Opinion in Ophthalmology. 2015; 26(4):306-13.